Inforaphics as an Information Design Tool

why-infographics-1

Infographics – Overview

Information graphics or Infographics is a term that refers to a number of different types of visual aids that can be used to express information. The use of graphics to convey information has the capacity to transform our understanding of an issue and, to some extent, free us from the narrowness of words, labels, and classification systems. Infographics is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginning of history, and cave paintings created by early humans could be considered the very first instances of infographics.  Infographics are used in all sorts of environments and places, and are an important element in determining what certain things mean. The various types of infographics that can be used include, but are not limited to, pictures, graphs, diagrams, charts, lists, maps, and tables. Which infographics will work best for a particular project, of course, will depend on what kind of information needs to be relayed.

 infographic examples

Tools for Creating your own Infographics

Several on-line infographics creators, such as Infogr.am, Piktochart and Easel.ly have been launched in 2012. These sites allows users to create infographics from pre-designed templates, add custom data and share infographics and charts on the web or download as pictures for placing in presentations. Infogr.am is a free service that generates interactive, javascript based online infographics and charts. Piktochart is a site that allows users to create infographics using pre-defined themes that allow some customization. Users can export an image of their infographic when they are done. Free access is limited, but a paid subscription allows users to create more infographics and utilize many more themes. Easel.ly is another free infographic creation site utilizing themes. Users have a canvas that they can drag themes and customizable graphics onto in order to personalize the look of their infographic.

Infographics Implemented in My Blog

Since I have began blogging, I have implemented the use of infographics in all of my posts in order to convey large amounts of information or deeper meaning. Take for instance the infographic at the top of a page. Without reading the text in the blog, you can look at this image and in just a few seconds understand what infographics are, why they are beneficial, and where they can be used to add value to information documents.

References:

Arafah, Bima. “Huge Infographics Design Resources: Overview, Principles, Tips and Examples.” Onextrapixel. Onextrapixel.com, 21 May 2010. Web. 8 Mar. 2013. <http://www.onextrapixel.com/2010/05/21/huge-infographics-design-resources-overview-principles-tips-and-examples/&gt;.

Michelle. “What Infographics Are and Why They’re Important for Websites.” Web log post.Get A Coder. Getacoder.com/, 1 Mar. 2012. Web. 8 Mar. 2013. <http://www.getacoder.com/blog/?p=3868&gt;.

Jacobson, Robert E. Information Design. Cambridge: MIT, 1999. Print.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Inforaphics as an Information Design Tool

  1. The image you found for this blog is perfect! It is easy to follow and answers our blog question quite easily. I also liked that you provided links to other sites that offer infographics and have looked at a few of those. The new term in our office lately is all about using infographics to show our numbers and for reports, so these links will be useful for me in professionally as well.
    T

  2. When I think of infographics I believe it could have one or multiple functions and can have different combinations such as : 1. advocate an issue 2.show the status of an indicator 3. compare indicators 4.demonstrate correlations 5.illustrate trends.
    With the society we live in we are subjected to this very thing on a daily basis but don’t stop to think “oh thats infographics”. Great flow of the blog 🙂

  3. The infographic that introduced your blog post is a fantastic example of an infographic. Not only is it easy to understand, but it is beautifully designed and presented aesthetically, as well, which holds people’s attention and makes it more likely that they’ll consume the whole message. Also very interesting that you mentioned cave paintings as being the first instances of infographics. They definitely relayed important information graphically. Thank you very much for including the links to online infographics creators – fascinating and helpful.

    – – Michelle Hayes

  4. The infographic that introduced your blog post is a fantastic example. Not only is it easy to understand, but it is beautifully designed aesthetically, as well, which holds people’s attention and makes it more likely that they’ll consume the whole message. Also very interesting that you mentioned cave paintings as being the first instances of infographics. They definitely relayed important information graphically. Thank you very much for including the links to online infographics creators – fascinating and helpful.

    – – Michelle Hayes

  5. Very nice! A wonderful post and the graphics were absolutely perfect! It is true that by using graphics it helps the end user to understand the concepts we are trying to get across. It also expands the users imagination and intrigues them to continue reading. For example the same information submitted as text only would certainly not be quite as interesting as a graphical presentation such as this. Unless the reader is very interested in the subject matter of the information they may be turned off quickly when presented with paragraphs of boring block text, nice job!
    ~Sandra Solomon

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s